Tag Archives: Wendat

“Spring Pastels” – Wendat Pond, Stouffville

“Spring Pastels” - Wendat Pond, Stouffville

“Nothing clashed because nothing had the strength to clash; everything murmured of safety among the hues; all was refinement.” ― Mervyn Peake

In anticipation of spring greens and colours, I find myself back in the familiar and somewhat commonplace of local walking trails. In the middle of town, I find small sanctuaries of wildlife and the remnants of last years plants which have survived the winter. relatively intact. Though my eyes see mainly greys, yellows, and browns, a deeper look yields subtle pastels, adding a softness to the stark and brittle stems.

I’m trying to see all aspects of life that way, looking beyond the surface and anticipating subtle beauty and wonderment in every situation. Admittedly, this can be a challenge, given the world we live in, with all its stresses and pressures, but I believe it to be a worthwhile goal.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 190 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Golden Splendour” – Wendat Pond, Stouffville

“Golden Splendour” - Wendat Pond, Stouffville

“Any patch of sunlight in a wood will show you something about the sun which you could never get from reading books on astronomy. These pure and spontaneous pleasures are ‘patches of Godlight’ in the woods of our experience.” ― C.S. Lewis

With spring just around the corner, this is the time of year where I go looking for signs of life re-emerging. The light is soft and indirect and casts wonderful shadows. I find myself looking at things differently. Textures, like those in the flowerheads above abound and make for interesting compositions. So, as I wait for signs of green and the first small flowers to appear, I’m happy to have these beautiful sights to satisfy me, as they were last year’s beauties.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Bathed in Gold” – Stouffville

“Bathed in Gold” - Stouffville

Similar to yesterday’s post, this photo was also made at Wendat Pond in the “Golden Hour”. This image took a bit more effort to set up, as I was deliberately trying to get the golden glow of the trees on the far shore as a backdrop and I was not very happy with my first few attempts. The bright glow I saw with my eyes was not being captured by the camera. So, a few more attempts later and this is the result. My goal is to represent not just what I see, but how I see it, through my photography.

It almost looks  like a fall image, but it is really mid-spring and the air is warming nicely and the tree in the background is a poplar, just coming into new leaf. The pale green leaves are catching the sun just right to reflect just the yellow tones and warming up the background.

Nikon D3000
Nikor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 95 mm
1/800 sec @ f/4.5, -0.33, ISO 250

“Past Beauty” – Dead Flowerheads, Wendat Pond, Stouffville

“Past Beauty” - Dead Flowerheads, Wendat Pond, Stouffville

I made this photo a few days ago while on an evening  walk. The light was just softening and I found the dead stems an interesting subject, considering the world around is greening up with the first few truly mild days.

These are old flower heads from wildflowers growing around Wendat Pond. The pond was named after a large native city that was found to have been located in this area. For me, it’s a nice place to walk and consider what it may have looked like a few centuries ago. Did those early people look at things the way I do?

To make this photo, I took advantage of the soft light and a depth of field just narrow enough to keep the stems in focus while trying to isolate the flower heads from the background.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-2000 mm f/2.8 @ 175 mm
1/125 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 250