Tag Archives: white

“Promise”

“Promise”

“Sometimes people don’t understand the promises they’re making when they make them. But you keep the promise anyway. That’s what love is. Love is keeping the promise anyway.” 
― John Green

There are times when I make and image and do a quick review in the camera display, where the title comes to me and sticks. The title of this image, “Promise” was such a moment. As in the word “promise’ itself, there is a pure, innocent, potential. Something to be fulfilled.

This flower, Thimbleweed – Anemone virginiana, not quite fully opened and still delicate, spoke promise to me. I can imagine it as a fully blossomed flower. It still has obstacles to overcome, as does anything in the outdoors. It may be trampled, insects may devour it, a blight may infect it, or some other force of nature may prevent it from achieving its potential. Yet, for now, it’s a promise, something I look forward to being fulfilled, with full confidence, despite adversity.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/400 sec, f/9.0 ISO 800

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“Field Bindweed – Convolvulus arvenis”

“Field Bindweed - Convolvulus arvenis”

“The miracle is that the brilliance of the miraculous can live in the blandness of the mundane. The greater miracle is that we have enough brilliance in our own blandness to see it.”
― Craig D. Lounsbrough

I’m finding even common items fascinating lately, as I get ‘close’ to them. The image above is of a common wildflower, or to gardeners, an invasive and prolific weed. I’ve seen entire lawns infested with this plant, yet along a hiking trail, it’s lovely. When composing this image, I realized that it reminded my one of those hugh Georgia O’Keeffe paintings and I think it would translate nicely from photo to painting, something I may do when the snow flies once more. But, for now, I think I’ll set the brushes aside and take in all that nature has to offer my lens and me.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/500 sec, f/7.1 ISO 400

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“Purity”

“Purity”

May you understand my love–because it is the only thing I have that is really mine, the only thing that I will be able to take with me into the next life. Please allow it to be courageous and pure; please make it capable of surviving the snares of the world.”
― Paulo Coelho

A simple title that describes my first impressions of this single, rain speckled, white peony blossom. Yesterday rained heavily and quite steadily, less than ideal conditions for peonies. So, I spend some time early in the morning salvaging a few of them to photograph and remember, before they get battered too badly.

Needless to say, this has been a spectacular year for my peonies and I’ve enjoyed photographing them at their peak. The raindrops are just an added bonus.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
0.8 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

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“First White Peony”

“First White Peony”

“She was pure, it was true, as he had never dreamed of purity; but cherries stained her lips.”
― Jack London

In this year’s theme of ‘firsts’, here’s yet another. The first white peony made its appearance in  my gardens this morning. These white peonies hold a special place in our family, having been passed do from my wife’s grandmother.

It’s an interesting blossom, being a beautiful pure white, with a tiny red fringe on the inside petals. I have yet to discover the particular variety. We also have another variant, similar to this one, but with splashes of red in the interior petals rather than the fine fringe.

I love these heritage peonies for a number of reasons: they are extremely hardy, once established, they have an intense wonderful fragrance, which fills the morning air, the blossoms are long lasting and make beautiful floral arrangements for indoors. Finally, once flowers are shed, the foliage is lush and green and changes to a deep crimson in the fall.

Late spring and early summer is a great time of anticipation in the garden. Watching blossoms going from bud to flower overnight is almost magical. Knowing our family ancestors have also experienced these moments makes it even more special. Common expressions among my family generally have a theme like, “Oh, look! Grandma Fretz’s peony is blooming, just in time for Fathers Day.”

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

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“Anemone Blossom”

“Anemone Blossom”

“I will be the gladdest thing under the sun! I will touch a hundred flowers and not pick one.”
― Edna St. Vincent Millay

Before they fade with the heat, I thought I’d make a quick image of this anemone blossom. Which, like all the studio close-ups, reveals wonderful details and complex structures. This blossom, a bit ‘mature’ has dropped a lot of pollen on the petals already. I’m not sure what pollinates them, but have not seen any bees pay them much attention.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.6 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

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“Star-of-Bethlehem”

“Star-of-Bethlehem” - Ornithogalum umbellatum

“What we do see depends mainly on what we look for. … In the same field the farmer will notice the crop, the geologists the fossils, botanists the flowers, artists the colouring, sportsmen the cover for the game. Though we may all look at the same things, it does not all follow that we should see them.”
― John Lubbock

This was, at one time, yet another ‘mystery’ plant that came from my mother-in-law’s garden when she moved. Many plants had finished blooming at the time she moved and I just stuck them into convenient locations and waited to see what emerged the following spring.

I almost weeded this one out, as it looks a lot like wide bladed grass when it leafs out. Then, suddenly, it’s filled with lovely white blossoms. I looked it up in one of my plant books, also discovering it’s yet another ‘non-native’ plant, imported from Eurasia and Africa as an early flowering garden plant. Of late, I’ve been sharing my photos on an amateur botany site and get some interesting reactions when I post ‘non-native’ plants. So, I think I will hold off on this one.

I made this image between frequent rain showers, which have been so prevalent the past few weeks, and the water droplets give it a nice effect.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/250 sec, f/7.1 ISO 100

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“Lily of the Valley”

“Lily of the Valley”

“If people did not love one another, I really don’t see what use there would be in having any spring.”
― Victor Hugo

This flower is my sure sign of spring. Though it was a bit late this year, due to cooler, wetter days, it still managed to bloom in May. There always seem to be a few hardy specimens that bloom early, despite cooler weather.

May is a busy month of celebrations in our family. It’s my wife’s birthday, my anniversary, my mother-in-law’s birthday, and my oldest daughter’s birthday, within a two-week span. And the lily of the valley is usually part of those celebrations, adding its sweet fragrance throughout.

With its brilliant white, bell-shaped flowers, it proved a bit more of a challenge to photograph that I had first thought. Either when whites were blown out or the green leaves were too dark. I managed to finally find the balance and am sharing it here.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com