Tag Archives: wildflower

“Dutchman’s Breeches”

“Dutchman’s Breeches”

“A little piece of everywhere I go becomes a big part of everything I do.”
― Richie Norton

Spring, has to be my favorite time of year. Not just because of the warming weather, but because every day has new discoveries, sometimes many. Having spent most of my life outdoors, I’m finding myself continually amazed at just how much of my world I casually ignored.

Becoming a deliberate photographer has transformed my world and how I see it. As the quote above puts it so succinctly, these little pieces of my experience have transformed me, they have become a part of who I am. Through my photography, I’m seeing the world in news ways, appreciating life in new ways, and loving it.

I think I also need to clarify a point above. By referring to myself as a ‘deliberate’ photographer, I mean I set out with a purpose. So, rather than just snapshots of events or casual observations of my day, I set out to really ‘see’ the world around me. I take the time to study a scene and compose my images to fully express what I have seen, with the hopes that this is conveyed to my audience. At minimum, it allows me time with the scene, allowing me to fully appreciate it.

In the case of the Dutchman’s Breeches above, I’ve seen photos of the plant in books, knew it grew around here, and looked for it, with no success. I made images of a close relative to it, Squirrel Corn, last year and did not notice that the plant in this photo was only a few meters away, as well as the bloodroot I shared earlier. Now I’m spending time observing associated plants and their related growing patterns. I can honestly say that I am learning something new every day and truly enjoying the journey.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/100 sec, f/18.0 ISO 100

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“First Trout Lily of the Season”

“First Trout Lily of the Season”

“Life is a first impression. You get one shot at it. Make it everlasting.”
― J.R. Rim

Another ‘first’ flower. This one was completely unexpected, which makes it all the more special. I had set out to make some more photos of the newly emerged bloodroot, which went quite well, despite wind gusts that interfered in my making the exposures as long as I prefer.

As I finished photographing a nice cluster of bloodroot, I noticed a small flash of yellow in my periphery. It turned out to be an early blooming Trout Lily. In fact, a very early trout lily. I was not expecting to see them for at least another week or so and this one is far more advanced than any of its neighbouring plants, which have just started to leaf out. Why it’s so far ahead will remain a mystery. Perhaps all the condition were just right and that small plot of soil got a bit more heat from the sun than the rest of the forest?

There was one more plant just starting to bud a few feet away but these two were the exception. I have a real fondness for trout lily, with their mottled leaves and delicate nodding yellow flowers.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/80 sec, f/20.0 ISO 320

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“First Bloodroot of the Season”

“First Bloodroot of the Season”

“In this delicate and unpredictable life, the future is unwritten. Do not take someone for granted today, for once tomorrow dawns upon the indigo night the only remaining trace will be tracks in the sand…”
― Virginia Alison

I really appreciate this wonderful, short-lived spring blossoms. The burst forth quickly in mid-April, bloom brightly for a few days and then are gone, a mere memory of the first warm days of spring.

Because of their brief beauty, I make a point of seeking them out every year, hoping to capture the spirit of this beautiful plant.

They are quite unique, as they emerge from the ground as small tube-like plants and then open up their green ‘capes’, revealing the delicate white flowers inside. It’s almost magical to me. I hoping to get back out again for a few more images before they fade, as the poem above, leaving only a faint trace of their existence.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/125 sec, f/16.0, ISO 400

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“Blue Cohosh Blossoms”

“Blue Cohosh Blossoms”

“This is a story about the color blue, and like blue, there’s nothing true about it. Blue is beauty, not truth. ‘True blue’ is a ruse, a rhyme; it’s there, then it’s not. Blue is a deeply sneaky color.”
― Christopher Moore

This is a plant I’ve been intrigued with for some time. It’s one of the first to emerge from the forest floor in this region and very odd in its colouration. While most spring plants vary in shades of greens and yellows, this plant is a blueish-purple. A bit hard to spot at first, but once you see it, it seems to be everywhere.

I’ve photographed it for the past few years, with varying satisfaction. This year, I returned with my macro lens, initially wanting to photograph just the opening plant. Then, I noticed the tiny yellow flowers, no more than two millimeters across, and hard to see clearly.

The macro lens revealed detail I could not have imagined. It’s opening up a new world to me, one that existed but was not readily visible to me, and I’m loving the view.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/30 sec, f/18.8, ISO 200

“Chickory”

“Chickory”

“A fleeting moment can become an eternity. From a past encounter everything may disappear in the dungeon of forgetfulness. A few furtive flashes or innocent twinkles can survive, though. Some immaterial details may remain marked in our memory, forever. A significant look, a salient colour or a unforeseen gesture may abide, indelibly engraved in our mind.”
― Erik Pevernagie

It continues to be dull and cold outside and I’ve been feeling under the weather with a nasty stomach bug of some sort. So, I went back to a few of the outdoor macro images I made this past summer and picked one of my favourites, the chickory flower.

There are very few things in nature that are naturally blue and this is one of them. They grow wild, especially in poor and stoney soil, in my area from June to October, depending on the weather. I made this image while on a photoshoot with my son back in late September, using my portable studio. I think the natural light does a nice job at bringing out all the textures and retaining teh natural colour, though the light that afternoon was quite hot and patchy, with nice gusty winds thrown in to increase the challenge level, especially when trying to show detail.

Despite the challenges presented, I’m very pleased with this image, which shows all the fine details often overlooked as we pass by these roadside weeds.

Nikon D800
Nikor AFS Micro 60mm f/2.8 US @ 60 mm

1/125 sec, f/18.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px

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“Joe-pye Weed”

“Joe-pye Weed

“He told her the flowers in her painting contained exactly the purple substance of the flowers on the desk in front of her […] Let us open the window and see if your painting can entice the butterflies.”
― Sarah Hall

Back out on the trails and enjoying the late summer heat. This oddly named plant, native to North America is named on a derivation of an aboriginal name Jopi, who was a native healer. Somewhere in time , the name stuck and became Joe-Pye.

This is a beautiful, tall, showy plant that can be found in wetlands and begins to bloom in late June. At this time of year, it’s still going strong and adds a nice plash of colour to the landscape as other plants are going to seed. Despite our drought-like conditions this summer, the local Joe-Pye is looking strong and healthy. Perhaps that is where one of its other names “Queen of the Meadow” comes from, as it’s also a very tall plant, related to sunflowers.

This particular specimen was found along the roadside, outside the hamlet of Claremont. I noticed a rather health customer of the plants just off the road and down a short path and decided this one was going to be the one I’d photograph, since it was very healthy and unblemished.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/8 sec, f/22.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Woodland Sunflower”

“Woodland Sunflower”

“Wildflower; pick up your pretty little head,
It will get easier, your dreams are not dead.”
― Nikki Rowe

I hope I have these named correctly. I’m hoping my wildflower followers will correct me as required.

It’s late summer and there is a noticeable shift in the plant life. The delicate pinks and purples are going to seed and yellows and orange are starting to make their showing. I’ll miss the abundance of wildflowers and the bright green healthy leaves, which are now showing insect damage and stress from our recent drought. This is the time of year when plants begin to look ‘tired’. But, change is inevitable and the bright colours of fall will soon dominate.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/4 sec, f/22.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com