Tag Archives: wind

“Breezy” – Bay of Quinte

“Breezy” - Bay of Quinte

“The wind skimmed the waters of the bay, creating infinite tendrils of foam that stretched as far as the eye could see.”
– Ed Lehming 

For me this was a rare opportunity to photograph a scene which I have seen and enjoyed several times over the past few years. It’s a view from the highway 49 bridge over Telegraph Narrows at the eastern end of the Bay of Quinte.

The bridge joins the mainland with the peninsula that makes up Prince Edward County. It’s a fairly high and expansive bridge and offers wonderful views ,both eastward and westward over the Bay of Quinte. But, it’s primarily a bridge for vehicles, with a narrow sidewalk along one shoulder. A rather long and steep walk to make photos.

Last weekend, the bridge was narrowed to a single lane for construction, with a stoplight regulating the traffic at the top of the bridge. SO, I found myself conveniently stopped a this beautiful vantage point. I reached in to the back seat of my truck, grabbed my camera and made a few photos of the bay, looking westward.

The wind, blowing from the west through the channel of Telegraph Narrows mad some interesting patterns on the water. I noticed there was only one sailboat out, so it may have been a bit too windy for people to actually enjoy a sail around the bay.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 135 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Painted by the Wind”

“Painted by the Wind”

“Cool spring breezes blew past me and set the wildflowers dancing, like purple paint brushes on a canvas of green leaves.”
– Ed Lehming 

Some things look so much more interesting if you look at them differently. We are so used to seeing things as stationary, even our eyes compensate for movement. So when that compensation is removed by the eye of the camera a new view appears.

I wanted to capture the wind patterns in the patch of Dame’s Rockets, so I left my shutter open of a quarter of a second to allow the movement to translate back to the image and I ended up with this somewhat impressionistic version. My biggest challenge over a few attempts was to get the exposure right in the bright sunshine.

It appears to me like the flowers and leaves are individual brush strokes of colour and the wind is the artist. Something worth pursuing a bit more deliberately in future images?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90m
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Who Has Seen the Wind?”

“Who Has Seen the Wind?”

“And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair” 
― Kahlil Gibran

The earth does delight in our bare feet and the trail rises ahead to greet me. I’ve spent the past couple of weekends back on the local trails, enjoying the fresh air and sound of the wind shaking the branches high above me, the air is filled with birdsong  and the scent of tree sap.

One of the things I try to communicate through my abstract photography is that the forest is a living breathing thing, it’s seldom still and especially so on windy days. Last weekend, as I was making a series of images on the trail, a gust of wind caught me, just as I snapped the shutter. I make these images freehand, as I like the natural feel and control I have of the creative process. The effect of this ‘gust’ was a very slight shift in the first portion of the my upward sweep, which at first bothered me, but the more I considered the final image, the more I liked it. The movement is a bit more distorted but adds a different axis of movement, caused by the wind which seems to make the whole scene spring to action, as if rustling in that same breeze. It’s like witnessing a deep exhalation of the forest, for a brief moment, and then it all settles back to the norm.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/25.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Blowin’ in the Wind”

“Blowin’ in the Wind”

“Voiceless it cries,
Wingless flutters,
Toothless bites,
Mouthless mutters.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien

I think I’ve photographed this tree about a dozen times. Sometimes, it’s still and brightened by a golden sunset, other times, it’s filled with birds, darting to and fro. But on this occasion, the strong winds of a hot summer day tossed it’s branches from side to side.

I took the opportunity to capture this motion through a long exposure and the results are quite pleasing. As I look at the photo, I can almost feel the ht sun on my back and feel gusts of wind blowing past me into the outstretched branches.

The slight motion blur makes the image look a bit like a painting.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Dead Maple on Reesor Road?” – Markham , Ontario

Dead Maple on Reesor Road

“Look at all the things around you, the immediate world around you. If you are alive, it will mean something to you, and if you care enough about photography, and if you know how to use it, you will want to photograph that meaningness.” – Paul Strand

I am reminded daily that I live in a living world. That world envelops me, nourishes me, sustains me. My eye picks up on subtle colours, a movement, some minor thing that stands out and gets my attention. As the quote above states so eloquently, these things mean something to me. These everyday scenes that fill our days which most people seem to pass by with some ingrained disregard.

In our ever busy world, I feel blessed that those moments do have meaning to me and that I can see them as a critical part of my world and experience. I’ve deliberately set out to share that meaning as best I can, through learning to become a better photographer, to convey meaningness by sharing those experiences here through images and words. My goal is to improve my ability and skills as a photographer, artist, and writer so that some of the meaning, richness, and joy that I take for my experiences can have similar meaning to others.

The image above was made a few years ago as I was driving home from an errand in a nearby town. It was a cold day in early January and the wind-whipped snow swirled in the fields like it was a living thing trying to escape the confines of the snowbanks.Most of the roadside grasses were already encased in a thick winter blanket, while a few hearty reeds bent in the wind. Among all this movement, a solitary maple, more dead than living, stood firmly and weathered the onslaught. Once more, when looking closely at what appeared to me, and was titled that way, as a dead tree, is still showing signs of life in a few of its branches, reminding me to be a better observer by slowing down and really understanding what I’m looking at.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 112 mm
1/200 sec, F/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Stormy December on Lake Huron” – Point Clarke

“Stormy December on Lake Huron” - Point Clarke

In stark contrast to the past few weeks, the final remaining days of December are reminding us that, despite the delay, the inevitable cycle of autumn to winter has continued.

The past weekend I had an opportunity to visit the shores of Lake Huron once more. I was there in January of this year and there is a significant difference. In January, the lakeshore was a wonderland of bizarre and outlandish shapes and structures, ranging for ice-volcanoes to vast sheets of clear blue ice strewn with soccer-ball sized spheres of ice, as far as the eye could see.

Due to our extremely mild fall, the lake remains ice-free, yet starkly cold looking. Yesterday, the winds came in from the North around 50 km/h with an air temperature around  minus three degrees Celsius. In the time it took to set up my tripod, the combination of damp wind from the lake and cold temperatures, had removed the feeling from my fingers. The wind howled and raged around me as I made a few photos of the Point Clarke lighthouse and the adjacent shoreline, before packing up and heading inland and out of the biting wind.

The photo above is one of several I made of this scene. I believe it captures the violent movement of the wind-whipped waves, the sale blue December sky and the brilliance of the pale white lighthouse nicely. It looks like I’m moving into winter photography mode now.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8, @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“Waves” Autumn Clouds near Fort Stewart

“Waves” - Autumn Clouds near Fort Stewart, Ontario

This photo seems appropriate for today. The weather here is dull and overcast, once more. It reminded me of this time last November, as I walked through a farm field at Fraser Lake Camp. It was also a gloomy day, and much cooler than this mild December. This was around 10:00am and the clouds, which had been just a flat sheet of gray, transformed themselves into this wonderful wave pattern, for about five minutes and then settled back to their previous state.

I wonder what atmospheric forces were at play to create this temporary ripple in the sky. I’ve seen it before, but not as wide or pronounced. It’s also important to note that it was a bit windy that day, so maybe there was some resonance in the gsts that set up this pattern. I’m open to opinions.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 70 mm
1/160 sec, @ f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com