Tag Archives: yellow

“Large Flowered Bellwort”

“Large Flowered Bellwort”

“Along forest paths, bright wildflowers dance in the gentle breeze, and an ever changing dance of colours, fragrances, and textures.”
– Ed Lehming

This spring has been a joy for me, as I really enjoy the multitude of spring ephemerals. Those first few green leaves and bright flowers are such a welcoming sight after months of snow and dull days.

What I have found most enjoyable is the experience of discovering new plants every year and expanding my knowledge of those plants. I’m constantly surprised when a species that I had not noticed before seems to spring up when least expected.

This year, that plant was the Large Flowered Bellwort, a plant that I have only experienced in the boreal forests near Bancroft, Ontario and even then, only as single isolated plants. Last week I came across several large clusters of them, right night to the hiking trail and I wondered why I not not noticed them in the past. Now, they seemed to be everywhere, not as profuse as the trilliums but in larger quantities than I had ever experienced before.

Despite having hiked this trail for many years, it still offers me surprises,every time I return.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/60 sec, f/9.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“September’s Yellow Sea”

“September’s Yellow Sea”

“That old September feeling, left over from school days, of summer passing, vacation nearly done, obligations gathering, books and football in the air … Another fall, another turned page: there was something of jubilee in that annual autumnal beginning, as if last year’s mistakes had been wiped clean by summer.” 
― Wallace Stegner

This image makes me grin. The pine trees appear to be awash or dancing in a sea of yellow created by the profusion of Goldenrod, unsteady on their feet. I say awash, because the various angles of the trunks makes them seem to be swaying in water, further enhanced by the deliberate camera motion.

They seemed a bit out-of-place, not quite part of the forest, yet not part of the meadow either. It’s a very bright scene further enhanced by the soft morning sunlight. The Goldenrod fills this meadow with bright and pure yellow, a sure sign that summer is winding down.

Yet, yellow is just a temporary thing, the yellow will eventually fade to orange and rust, and then be gone for months, its warm brightness replaced by the harsh whites of winter. So, I’ll drink it in, while I can, letting the sun warm me for a few more weeks and looking forward to the cool gentleness and bright colours of autumn.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 112mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0 ISO 280

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Garden Sunshine”

“Garden Sunshine”

“It was June, and the world smelled of roses. The sunshine was like powdered gold over the grassy hillside.” 
― Maud Hart Lovelace

I noticed, as I wrote this post, that I have not posted an image since May 31st. That’s what happens when you step away from something for too long; the time gets filled with other things.

The discipline of posting every day has been a very fulfilling experience for me. It forced me to be inspired when I was not and has taken me into the world of writing, which is not something I believe I am very good at. Posting and writing daily has caused me to consider my photos on a much deeper level. Writing about them has allowed me to go back to photos and the words that wrote and reflect back on that time and place. It has become a journal of my journey into me deliberate photography and has expanded my ability to explain much of the ‘why’ behind the photograph as well as the ‘how’.

So, today, as the rain finally falls outside, bringing much-needed moisture, summer is upon as, and so too, are roses.

As those who follow my blog will realize, I have a love for gardening and most plants do very well in my gardens. The one plant I have not been really interested in  is the rose. I love the look and fragrance of them, but have not felt a desire to grow the. My father was an avid and successful rose gardener, but for some reason, I never picked up on his particular passion. Perhaps that will be my challenge for next season.

The rose pictured above is actually named Garden Sunshine by the Richmond Hill Horticultural Society and is described by the hybridizer as ” “brilliant yellow, like sunshine in a plant,”. That is an apt description for this beautiful rose. What the description leaves out is the magnificent fragrance. I’m actually looking forward to having them in may garden.

The blossoms I photographed were given to my wife by a family friend who has several of these roses in his garden.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
3.0 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Secord Forest Trout Lily”

“Secord Forest Trout Lily”

“Shine brightly, so you can help those who have not found their path a way through the darkness.” 
― Jeffrey Fry

It would simply not feel like spring without Trout Lilies. These delicate little beauties are often slow to come to bloom, but not this year. Within days they went from delicate foliage to full bloom. Whole sections of the forest were filled with theses beautiful yellow flowers and it was hard to pick which one to photograph. They bring such brightness to an otherwise dull scene.

At one point in my hike, I simply sat for a while and enjoyed them. As I sat, looking across a large patch of them, I noticed many bees and flies going from flower to flower, enjoying the feast of pollen these early bloomers provide. The whole scene was abuzz with activity. It’s like watching the world suddenly come alive with sound and movement.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

1/500 sec, f/11.0, ISO 400 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Lunch for Two”

“Lunch for Two”

“Unfamiliar disturbs us; familiar comforts us! But for the wise man, unusual is more precious than the usual because it offers us a new way, a new vision, a new idea, a new world!” 
― Mehmet Murat ildan

Quite often, I come across scenes that make me pause, because they are unusual or momentary. For me, those scenes are a break from the mundane, everyday scenes, and I relish them. Like this image of two Black Blister Beetles (Epicauta pennsylvanica), feasting on recently blooming Goldenrod. I also had to look the beetles up, since I was not sure what they were. To my surprise, most images of the beetles have them feeding on Goldenrod. So perhaps, this is not so unusual after all?

In my many hours hiking local trails I have not noticed these beetles, which on this particular day seemed to be infesting most of the Goldenrod along the trails. It may have been a unique event for this day, or I may simply have missed seeing it in the past.

What made this scene more interesting to me was that all the beetles; there where more than just these two, were all facing the same direction. It’s just the close proximity of these two that made me come up with the title. I did go back out the next day and the beetles were gone.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/400 sec, f/10.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Yellow Coneflower – Ratibita pinnata”

“Yellow Coneflower - Ratibita pinnata”

“Some painters transform the sun into a yellow spot, others transform a yellow spot into the sun. “
– Pablo Picasso

The Yellow Coneflowers literally quiver in the slight breeze, their delicate petals, like small yellow rags, seem to barely hang on.

Such is the scene in a local field, where Yellow Coneflowers are common. Even the gentle breeze of a hot summer day create movement in these flowers. It’s very nice to look at, but proves a challenge to photograph. Thus, I made the decision to harvest a blossom for the studio.

It was an opportunity to really look deep into the structures that make up this delicate summer blossom, from the tender yellow petals to the complex structure of the ‘cone’ from which the plant takes its name.

It was a bit of a tough shot to light, the petals so bright and the details of the cone, lost in shadow, yet it turned out alright and drew my attention to the small green frills, known as ‘sepals’ through which the petals emerge. The things we don’t notice, show up in the right light.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/36.0, ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Common Yellow Wood Sorrel”

“Common Yellow Wood Sorrel”

“When you overlook the small blessings in your life, chances are that no amount of blessings would ever make you happy.” 
― Edmond Mbiaka

I thought today I’d go out and capture a very simple image of a flower, which sadly, flourishes in my gardens. I have no idea where it came from, but I do know it loves to call my gardens home, despite me constantly weeding it out.

The plant is known as common yellow wood sorrel and starts out looking like a three leafed clover, till it blooms with it’s pretty yellow flowers. Yet, after a while it shows up everywhere and I can hardly keep up with it by the end of the summer.

In the good soil of my gardens it grows to a height of nearly 20 centimeters and seems to fill every vacant patch of garden, if not quickly removed. It’s doing particularly well this year, with our non-stop rainfalls.

So, I decided to make a photo of it, close up, so that I could “try’ to appreciate it. And I do, it’s a beautiful little flower, but I’d appreciate it more if it was not so prolific in  my gardens.  🙂

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/200 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com